Patricia Callahan

Senior Reporter

Photo of Patricia Callahan

Patricia Callahan is a senior reporter covering business.

Callahan previously worked at the Chicago Tribune, where she was on the investigative team since 2004. There, she launched “Hidden Hazards,” a series that showed federal safety regulators were repeatedly failing to protect children from dangerous products. This work prompted the recall of more than 1 million baby products, spurred Congress to pass the largest overhaul of consumer product safety laws in a generation, and won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.

In 2012, Callahan and colleagues showed how harmful chemicals used as flame retardants on furniture were migrating into people’s bodies while providing no meaningful protection from fires. The work led to the repeal of a rule responsible for the use of these chemicals; it also won the Goldsmith prize and was a finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer for investigative reporting. Most recently, Callahan and a colleague were 2017 Pulitzer finalists for a series exposing how Illinois officials steered low-income adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities into substandard privately run group homes, then hid harm and even deaths.

Before the Tribune, Callahan worked at the Wall Street Journal, covering the food, pharmaceuticals and publishing industries. There, she revealed how newspaper publishers — including the Journal’s parent company — financially abandoned children injured or killed on their newspaper delivery routes. She came to the Journal from the Denver Post, where she was part of the team that covered the Columbine High School shootings.

Trish graduated from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and was a Henry Luce Scholar in Bangkok.

The Trump Administration Is Backing Out of a $647 Million Ventilator Deal After ProPublica Investigated the Price

The government overpaid by hundreds of millions for Philips ventilators, says a House investigation spurred by ProPublica reporting. Now that deal is off and Congress is scrutinizing other coronavirus deals made by trade adviser Peter Navarro.

The White House Paid Up to $500 Million Too Much for These Ventilators, Congressional Investigators Say

A House panel says “gullible” White House negotiators overpaid for Phillips ventilators, and it has asked the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General to investigate evidence of fraud in the deal.

Inside the Trump Administration’s Decision to Leave the World Health Organization

Despite Trump’s declared exit from the WHO, officials continued working toward reforms and to prevent withdrawal. This week, they were told they must justify any cooperation with the WHO on the grounds of national security and public health safety.

Congress Is Investigating Whether a Ventilator Company Is Gouging the U.S. — and Why the Government Is Letting It Happen

A congressional subcommittee is questioning a federal decision to pay quadruple the price for the commercial version of a ventilator Royal Philips N.V. had developed with taxpayer funds.

A Company Promised Cheap Ventilators to the Government, Never Delivered and Is Now Charging Quadruple the Price for New Ones

Royal Philips N.V. agreed in September to sell 10,000 ventilators to the U.S. for $3,280 each. It did not deliver. But the Dutch company just announced a new deal with the government. This time, it’s charging roughly $15,000 each.

Taxpayers Paid Millions to Design a Low-Cost Ventilator for a Pandemic. Instead, the Company Is Selling Versions of It Overseas.

As coronavirus sweeps the globe, there is not a single Trilogy Evo Universal ventilator — developed with government funds — in the U.S. stockpile. Meanwhile, Royal Philips N.V. has sold higher-priced versions to clients around the world.

Senators Call on Highway Administration to Finalize Car Seat Test Rules

Two senators, citing ProPublica’s reporting on the dangers of Evenflo’s booster seats, want NHTSA to finish rules that Congress mandated 20 years ago.

House Subcommittee Opens Investigation of Evenflo, Maker of “Big Kid” Booster Seats

The probe comes after ProPublica’s story showing that the company put marketing of its “Big Kid” booster seats over child safety.

Do You Make, Test or Market Car Seats or Boosters?

Do you or did you work with any of the booster seat makers? How were they tested and marketed? We want to hear from you.

The Most Important Thing Every Parent Needs to Know About Car Seat Safety

ProPublica has published a report on how one booster seat maker put children at risk. For parents, here’s some of the most pressing information our reporters discovered during their investigation.

Evenflo, Maker of the “Big Kid” Booster Seat, Put Profits Over Child Safety

Internal video of side-impact tests shows that children could be injured or killed in Evenflo's “Big Kid” booster seats. But the company continued to market them as “side-impact tested.”

Inside Documents Show How Amazon Chose Speed Over Safety in Building Its Delivery Network

Amazon ignored or dismissed safety concerns about its delivery network to prioritize speed and explosive growth, according to new documents and interviews with insiders.

Amazon Cuts Contracts With Delivery Companies Linked to Deaths

More than 2,000 workers in eight states will lose their jobs after Amazon dropped three companies after reports by BuzzFeed News and ProPublica.

Senators Frustrated by Amazon’s “Evasive” Response to Questions on Driver Safety

Amazon refuses to disclose the names of the contractors it uses to deliver its packages, calling it “competitive, confidential business information.”

Senator Demands Answers From Amazon on Delivery Crashes and Contract Drivers

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, citing a ProPublica investigation, blasts Amazon for “evasive practices and moves to cut regulatory corners.”

How Amazon Hooked America On Fast Delivery While Avoiding Responsibility for Crashes

Our investigation found Amazon escapes responsibility for its role in deaths and serious injuries even though the company keeps a tight grip on how third-party delivery drivers do their jobs.

His Mother Was Killed by a Van Making Amazon Deliveries. Here’s the Letter He Wrote to Jeff Bezos.

“I think this attitude of reckless speed stems from the top and trickles down,” Tyler Hayes wrote.

A Truck Delivering Amazon Holiday Packages. A Crash. A Family That Will Never Be the Same.

Two weeks shy of her 85th birthday, Telesfora Escamilla was struck and killed by a van delivering Amazon packages. The driver was acquitted. The family is suing Amazon.

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