Racial Justice

Series

Polluter’s Paradise

Environmental Impact in Louisiana

Dispossessed

How Black Families Are Losing Their Land

Invisible Walls

Connecticut’s Separate and Unequal Housing

Unprotected

Rape at an American Charity in Liberia

Driven Into Debt

How Tickets Burden the Poor

Walking While Black

Pedestrian Enforcement and Racial Profiling

Too Broke for Bankruptcy

How Bankruptcy Fails Those Who Need It Most

Lost Mothers

Maternal Care and Preventable Deaths

Documenting Hate

Tracking Hate Crimes and Bias Incidents

Segregation Now

Investigating America’s racial divide in education, housing and beyond.

Busted

Examining Chemical Field Tests

Machine Bias

Investigating Algorithmic Injustice

Nuisance Abatement

The NYPD’s Aggressive Enforcement of a Little-known Law

Dispatches from Freedom Summer

Race Then and Now

Stories

Black Workers Are More Likely to Be Unemployed but Less Likely to Get Unemployment Benefits

More people than ever became eligible for unemployment benefits after Congress included part-time and gig workers, but the data shows that hasn’t solved a huge racial disparity. Here’s why.

Grace, Black Teen Jailed for Not Doing Her Online Coursework, Is Released

Grace’s story, first published by ProPublica Illinois, prompted outrage and debate across the country. Though a judge refused to set the girl free, the Michigan Court of Appeals ordered her immediate release from a juvenile detention facility in Detroit.

El COVID-19 golpea Texas y los hispanos son quienes más mueren

En el condado más grande de Texas, una parte desproporcionada de los nuevos pacientes hospitalizados por COVID-19 — hasta un 65% en algunas semanas — han sido hispanos.

Prosecutors Say They Support Releasing Girl Who Was Detained for Not Doing Her Schoolwork

Although earlier this year prosecutors pushed for the detention of a Michigan high schooler during the COVID-19 pandemic, they have now repeatedly said they support sending her home to her mother.

“It Cost Me Everything”: In Texas, COVID-19 Takes a Devastating Toll on Hispanic Residents

Not only are Hispanics catching coronavirus at higher rates in Texas’ largest county, they also suffer some of the worst outcomes.

What People Who Live in Mostly White Towns Need to Know About History

How can white people elevate stories of people of color? Are there ways residents of small towns can address structural racism? Here are more answers to your questions about sundown towns and a video of our event.

Judge Won’t Free Michigan Teenager Sent to Juvenile Detention After Not Doing Online Schoolwork

At a hearing Monday, Judge Mary Ellen Brennan denied a motion to release a 15-year-old from a juvenile facility. “I think you are exactly where you are supposed to be,” Brennan said. “You are blooming there, but there is more work to be done.”

Trump Financial Regulator Quietly Shelved Discrimination Probes Into Bank of America and Other Lenders

At least six investigations into discriminatory mortgage loan “redlining” have been halted or stalled — against staff recommendations — under the Trump administration’s Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

How a Key Federal Civil Rights Agency Was Sidelined as Historic Protests Erupted

Launched by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964, the Community Relations Service has been without a director and short-staffed during recent unrest. The Trump administration has repeatedly tried to eliminate the agency.

A Hospital Was Accused of Racially Profiling Native American Women. Staff Said Administrators Impeded an Investigation.

Federal regulators are investigating a New Mexico hospital accused of racial profiling. This comes as hospital staff said administrators appeared to hide documents and discouraged cooperation with an initial state inquiry.

Slavery Existed in Illinois, but Schools Don’t Always Teach That History

Schools often teach the Civil War in terms of “free states” and “slave states.” Illinois complicates those definitions. We spoke with a historian and high school teacher about slavery’s legacy in Illinois.

State Investigating Hospital With Coronavirus Policy That Profiled Pregnant Native American Mothers and Separated Them From Newborns

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham cited “significant, awful allegations” in a ProPublica and New Mexico In Depth story on a hospital where clinicians said pregnant Native women were singled out for COVID-19 testing and separated from newborns after delivery.

A Hospital’s Secret Coronavirus Policy Separated Native American Mothers From Their Newborns

Pregnant Native American women were singled out for COVID-19 testing based on their race and ZIP code, clinicians say. While awaiting results, some mothers were separated from their newborns, depriving them of the immediate contact doctors recommend.

A Sundown Town Sees Its First Black Lives Matter Protest

Most people I met in Anna, Illinois, wish the racist lore behind the city’s name would go away. Some say Anna’s first Black Lives Matter protest is a step toward real change. But what is next?

The Police Have Been Spying on Black Reporters and Activists for Years. I Know Because I’m One of Them.

Wendi C. Thomas is a black journalist who has covered police in Memphis. One officer admitted to spying on her. She’s on a long list of prominent black journalists and activists who have been subjected to police surveillance over decades.

On the Minds of Black Lives Matter Protesters: A Racist Health System

Black lives are being lost to COVID-19 at twice the rate of others. For protesters we talked to, that’s one more reason to be on the street. “If it’s not police beating us up, it’s us dying in a hospital from the pandemic,” one said.

Police Brutality, COVID-19 and Overdoses in Chicago Follow the Same Deadly Pattern

Our country’s long history of structural racism stands at the center of why police brutality, COVID-19 and the opioid crisis are disproportionately killing black Americans, including in Chicago.

What Experts Say About Narrowing COVID-19 Racial Disparities

Our latest digital discussion addressed why the coronavirus has disproportionately struck communities of color and potential pathways to change.

The Black American Amputation Epidemic

Black patients were losing limbs at triple the rate of others. The doctor put up billboards in the Mississippi Delta. Amputation Prevention Institute, they read. He could save their limbs, if it wasn’t too late.

COVID-19 Took Black Lives First. It Didn’t Have To.

In Chicago, 70 of the city’s 100 first recorded victims of COVID-19 were black. Their lives were rich, and their deaths cannot be dismissed as inevitable. Immediate factors could — and should — have been addressed.

Early Data Shows Black People Are Being Disproportionally Arrested for Social Distancing Violations

Crowds of mostly white protesters have defied Ohio’s stay-at-home order without arrest, while in several of the state’s biggest jurisdictions, police departments have primarily arrested black people for violating the order.

“Similar to Times of War”: The Staggering Toll of COVID-19 on Filipino Health Care Workers

One of every four Filipinos in the New York-New Jersey area is employed in the health care industry. With at least 30 worker deaths and many more family members lost to the coronavirus, a community at the epicenter of the pandemic has been left reeling.

These Workers Packed Lip Gloss and Pandora Charm Bracelets. They Were Labeled “Essential” but Didn’t Feel Safe.

PFS, which packs and ships jewelry and cosmetics, stayed open even as employees have tested positive for coronavirus. Some temporary workers say they quit over a lack of workplace protections, but agencies keep sending people to $9 an hour jobs.

Los New Yorkers: Essential and Underprotected in the Pandemic’s Epicenter

In a city besieged, undocumented New Yorkers have been left outside public measures to help those impacted by the spread of the coronavirus. Instead, they weigh impossible choices: medical help and exposure, safety or sustenance.

In Chicago, Urban Density May Not Be to Blame for the Spread of the Coronavirus

The communities hardest hit by the coronavirus in Chicago are low-density black and Hispanic neighborhoods, including ones where economic decline and population loss have caused more people to live in the same household.

Early Data Shows African Americans Have Contracted and Died of Coronavirus at an Alarming Rate

No, the coronavirus is not an “equalizer.” Black people are being infected and dying at higher rates. Here’s what Milwaukee is doing about it — and why governments need to start releasing data on the race of COVID-19 patients.

It’s Time for Sundown Towns to Become a More Visible Part of Illinois History. But How?

If you are discussing your community’s history of racial exclusion, or if you would like to start, let us know.

After Our Reporting, Connecticut Officials Are Taking On Housing Segregation

In one of the most segregated states in the nation, the governor and legislators are calling for new measures to entice towns to build more affordable housing.

Tens of Thousands of People Lost Driver’s Licenses Over Unpaid Parking Tickets. Now, They’re Getting Them Back.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed legislation Friday to end license suspensions for unpaid parking tickets, affecting nearly 55,000 Illinois motorists. Lawmakers cited ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ Chicago reporting for leading to the new law.

How Wealthy Towns Keep People With Housing Vouchers Out

Section 8 vouchers should give low-income people the opportunity to live outside poor communities. But discriminatory landlords, exclusionary zoning and the federal government’s hands-off approach leave recipients with few places to call home.

What We Found in Three Years of Documenting Hate: A Letter to Our Partners

As the project investigating hate in America comes to an end, we look back at reporting highlights and the impact of our work.

Health Officials in “Cancer Alley” Will Study if Living Near a Controversial Chemical Plant Causes Cancer

Louisiana officials will knock on every door within 2.5 kilometers of the only plant in the country that emits chloroprene, which the EPA calls a likely carcinogen. An analysis said the airborne cancer risk near the plant was the highest in the nation.

Separated by Design: Why Affordable Housing Is Built in Areas With High Crime, Few Jobs and Struggling Schools

Connecticut’s approach to affordable housing creates pockets of poverty, where low-income people are locked out of opportunities that are just around the corner.

What Could Happen if a $9.4 Billion Chemical Plant Comes to “Cancer Alley”

In St. James Parish, Louisiana, a Taiwanese industrial giant seems likely to be granted a permit to build a billion-dollar plastics plant. Its proposed emissions could triple levels of cancer-causing chemicals in one of the most toxic areas of the U.S.

New EPA Rules Aim to Reduce Toxic Emissions. But Many “Cancer Alley” Chemical Plants Won’t Have to Change.

The proposed rules reducing emissions across the country would not apply to many of Louisiana’s chemical plants. These facilities release tons of dangerous, cancer-causing chemicals like ethylene oxide, and more plants are on the way.

Black Farmers Say a Top Chicken Company Turned Them Away

New allegations surfaced in a lawsuit after ProPublica’s investigation of Koch Foods in Mississippi. The company denies discriminating against black farmers.

They Are Racist; Some of Them Have Guns. Inside the White Supremacist Group Hiding in Plain Sight.

Patriot Front is perhaps the most active white supremacist group in the nation. ProPublica explores its origins, secret communications, history of arrests and outsize aims for an all-white America.

The Legend of A-N-N-A: Revisiting an American Town Where Black People Weren’t Welcome After Dark

Most people I met in Anna, Illinois, wish the racist lore behind the city’s name would go away. So, why hasn’t it?

Welcome to “Cancer Alley,” Where Toxic Air Is About to Get Worse

Air quality has improved for decades across the U.S., but Louisiana is backsliding. Our analysis found that a crush of new industrial plants will increase concentrations of cancer-causing chemicals in predominantly black and poor communities.

How We Identified the Frat Brothers Holding Guns in Front of an Emmett Till Memorial

We searched through property records, tips from Instagram users, and dozens of Instagram and Facebook photos and videos to figure out their names.

This Lawyer Fought Housing Segregation. Now Wealthy Suburbanites Want to Fire His Firm.

Westport is the second Connecticut town this year to pressure one of the state’s leading law firms to abandon its affordable housing work — or risk losing the local school system as a client.

Chicago City Council Approves Ticket and Debt Collection Reforms to Help Low-Income and Minority Motorists

The measures, which were prompted by a ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ Chicago investigation, are scheduled to take effect by mid-November.

He Spent Years Infiltrating White Supremacist Groups. Here’s What He Has to Say About What’s Going on Now.

Michael German, a former federal agent, sees cause for praise and concern.

Trump Called Baltimore “Vermin Infested” While the Federal Government Fails to Clean Up Rodents in Subsidized Housing

Baltimore’s public housing is among the most dilapidated and dangerous in the country — nearly half of complexes failed inspection — and Trump just spent a week attacking the city on Twitter.

Federal Government Wants to Hear From Heirs’ Property Owners

Ten days after a story about black families losing their land, the USDA scheduled listening sessions to hear from people who have had trouble qualifying for federal programs because their land was passed down without a will.

She’s Risked Arrest by Driving With a Suspended License for Seven Years. This Week She Got Some Big News.

Some 55,000 Illinoisans could regain their driver’s licenses very soon.

We Found Photos of Ole Miss Students Posing With Guns in Front of a Shot-Up Emmett Till Memorial. Now They Face a Possible Civil Rights Investigation.

Three students were suspended from their fraternity house, Kappa Alpha, after we shared an Instagram photo one of the men posted that was taken in front of a sign commemorating the murder of the 14-year-old black youth in 1955.

“How in 2019 Do We Not Have Enough Spanish-Speaking Caseworkers?”

Lawmakers respond to DCFS’s repeated violations of a court order to provide Spanish-speaking services to Spanish-speaking families.

Illinois Lawmakers Demand Child Welfare Officials Better Serve Spanish-Speaking Families

State officials now say they want to increase bilingual hiring and the recruitment of Spanish-speaking foster families.

How to Close Heirs’ Property Loopholes

What to consider to avoid losing land that has been passed down through generations without a will and is shared among heirs.

Digital Jail: How Electronic Monitoring Drives Defendants Into Debt

Ankle bracelets are promoted as a humane alternative to jail. But private companies charge defendants hundreds of dollars a month to wear the surveillance devices. If people can’t pay, they may end up behind bars.

Inside the Secret Border Patrol Facebook Group Where Agents Joke About Migrant Deaths and Post Sexist Memes

The three-year-old group, which has roughly 9,500 members, shared derogatory comments about Latina lawmakers who plan to visit a controversial Texas detention facility on Monday, calling them “scum buckets” and “hoes.”

How a Top Chicken Company Cut Off Black Farmers, One by One

The Trump administration has weakened legal protections for farmers and eased off enforcing rules on powerful meat companies.

A Lawsuit Over Ferguson’s “Debtors Prison” Drags On

The federal class-action claims thousands of people in Missouri were jailed because they couldn’t pay off fines. Four years after the suit was filed, the plaintiffs are still waiting, and wondering if the deck is stacked against them.

“Enough Is Enough”: Native Leaders Ask William Barr to Help Fix Alaska’s Law Enforcement Crisis

At a gathering in Anchorage, the U.S. attorney general said he would work to provide greater security in rural areas.

Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing

In southwest Connecticut, the gap between rich and poor is wider than anywhere else in the country. Invisible walls created by local zoning boards and the state government block affordable housing and, by extension, the people who need it.

New York City’s Early Voting Plan Will Favor White, Affluent Voters, Advocacy Groups Say

In a letter, the New York Civil Liberties Union, Common Cause New York and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law said the plan “will impose a severe burden on many of the City’s low-income voters.”

“I Now Have the Perspective of Both Sides”: 18 Voting Officials Take Civil Rights Tour

A trip that included a walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, drew a number of officials from states with controversial voting requirements.

More Than Me Still Lacks Adequate Systems to Protect Children in Its Care, New Report Says

At a charity where a ProPublica investigation showed a senior staffer preyed on girls, safety issues remain and the organization’s former leader still has not accepted responsibility, an audit finds.

What Will Come of the More Than Me Rape Scandal?

After a ProPublica report last year, the American charity and Liberian government promised to independently investigate. Amid the silence that followed, something strange happened involving the principal of a school run by More Than Me.

More Than Me Founder and CEO Katie Meyler Resigns

She had been on a leave of absence for six months after ProPublica investigated rape at her charity in Liberia.

TSA Agents Say They’re Not Discriminating Against Black Women, But Their Body Scanners Might Be

The full-body scanners at airports across the country frequently give false alarms for Afros, braids, twists and other hairstyles popular among black women.

HUD Sues Facebook Over Housing Discrimination and Says the Company’s Algorithms Have Made the Problem Worse

The charge comes a week after Facebook made major changes to its advertising platform, and two years after our reporting raised the issue.

Facebook Won’t Let Employers, Landlords or Lenders Discriminate in Ads Anymore

The sweeping changes come two years after ProPublica’s reporting, which sparked lawsuits and widespread outrage.

The Tragedy of Baltimore

Since Freddie Gray’s death in 2015, violent crime has spiked to levels unseen for a quarter century. How order collapsed in an American city.

The Ticket Trap: Front to Back

The project gave us an opportunity to try a bunch of technical approaches that could help a small organization like ours develop sustainable news apps.

Chicago Public Schools Monitored Social Media for Signs of Violence, Gang Membership

School officials say the monitoring was about keeping students safe, not punishing them. But critics say it expanded the role of police in schools and increased surveillance of children.

“Get Out”: Black Families Harassed in Their Own Homes

Our Documenting Hate database shows that the terrorizing of people where they live is alive and well decades after the civil rights movement.

U.S. to Investigate Discrimination Against Native American Students on Montana Reservation

The Education Department said it will look into a long-standing complaint of racial inequities in Wolf Point schools after The New York Times and ProPublica wrote a story about the issue.

6 Young Men, Given Adult Sentences for “Minor” Infractions, Are Freed in Illinois

Gov. Bruce Rauner commuted the sentences of the men, whose cases were documented in a ProPublica Illinois investigation last year, less than three weeks before leaving office.

District of Despair: On a Montana Reservation, Schools Favor Whites Over Native Americans

Tribes say that discrimination by the Wolf Point School District contributes to some of their youth dropping out, harming themselves or even committing suicide. But the Trump administration hasn’t acted on their complaint.

On a Reservation, a Second Chance for Prisoners and Their Warden

As a school board member in Wolf Point, Montana, Ron Jackson couldn’t help struggling Native students as much as he hoped. Now some are inmates under his supervision.

He Drew His School Mascot — and ICE Labeled Him a Gang Member

How high schools have embraced the Trump administration’s crackdown on MS-13, and destroyed immigrant students’ American dreams.

Documenting Hate in America: What We Found in 2018

In our second year of the Documenting Hate project, ProPublica and our partners have reported on everything from violent neo-Nazis to road rage to anti-Semitic vandalism.

Chicago Task Force Will Take on Ticket and Debt Collection Reform

The group is part of an effort to make vehicle ticketing less unfair.

Chicago Throws Out 23,000 Duplicate Tickets Issued Since 1992 to Motorists Who Didn’t Have Vehicle Stickers

The move is the city’s latest effort to reform its troubled ticketing and debt collection practices.

“I Don’t Want to Shoot You, Brother”

A shocking story of police and lethal force. Just not the one you might expect.

Member of White Supremacist Group Pleads Guilty to Assaults at 2017 Rally

Tyler Laube is one of the eight members or associates of the Rise Above Movement who were arrested on federal riot charges.

An Atomwaffen Member Sketched a Map to Take the Neo-Nazis Down. What Path Officials Took Is a Mystery.

Some experts and former officials see the case as part of a larger pattern, evidence that federal agencies are understaffed and out of position in confronting the threat of white supremacist terrorism — even as the FBI’s latest report shows a spike in hate crimes for the third straight year.

Brothers Whom Authorities Linked to Pittsburgh Shooting Suspect Had Flyer Supporting Neo-Nazi Group, Officials Say

Prosecutors indicated that the contents of the Washington, D.C., house they searched bolstered their fear that Jeffrey and Edward Clark might well have been bent on violence.

How HUD’s Inspection System Fails Low-Income Tenants Nationwide

Dangerous buildings sometimes pass inspections and scores whipsaw with seemingly little explanation, an analysis by The Southern Illinoisan and ProPublica has found. The system has led to a culture of making cosmetic fixes and avoiding major repairs.

Nearly All the Officers in Charge of an Indiana Police Department Have Been Disciplined — Including the Chief Who Keeps Promoting Them

Of the 34 supervisors in the Elkhart, Indiana, Police Department, 28 have been disciplined. Fifteen have been suspended. Seven have been involved in fatal shootings. Three have been convicted of criminal charges.

Brothers Who Were Online Friends With Pittsburgh Shooting Suspect Had Ties to Violent Neo-Nazis

The authorities said they arrested a Washington, D.C., man who had hailed the suspect and might have known more about the attack. The man and his brother had talked of wanting to kill Jews and blacks, prosecutors said.

Chicago City Council Approves Modest First Reforms on Ticketing and Debt

The changes signal a growing acknowledgement that the city’s reliance on fines and fees to generate revenue has come at a significant cost for some residents.

Top Chicago Alderman Adds to Growing Momentum for Ticket and Debt Reform

The proposal, the latest in a series of reforms aiming to respond to growing public pressure, would make it easier for motorists to avoid having their driver’s licenses suspended.

Why Jeff Sessions’ Final Act Could Have More Impact Than Expected

Just before he left, the departing attorney-general adopted a policy to limit the Justice Department’s ability to oversee abusive police departments. That same policy could also hamper the department’s role in environmental, voting-rights, and other cases.

These Voters Had to Wait for Hours: “It Felt Like a Type of Disenfranchisement”

Many would-be voters’ first attempts were foiled by problems at polling places. There isn’t good data on how many people ultimately don’t cast a ballot.

Georgia Voters Face Hourslong Waits as State Scrambles to Accommodate Turnout

Voters across the state are facing waits of up to five hours as lines snake out the doors and administrators rush to get additional materials to the polls.

Chicago Considers Wiping Away Old Ticket Debt for Motorists Who File for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

The proposal is intended to discourage drivers from filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but it does nothing to change onerous payment plans for motorists who don’t file at all.

Murder Charge Can’t Deter Sharpton’s Brother From Voting Rights Crusade

As more states adopt laws that could restrict turnout, Kenneth Glasgow and his allies are pushing to extend the vote to millions of ex-felons. Will the flimsily supported charge against him undermine this movement on the verge of its greatest success?

Chicago Alderman Proposes Reining in Ticket Penalties That Drove Thousands of Black Motorists Into Debt

The proposal would cap late penalties and create community service alternatives to some fines.

Reporting Recipe: How to Investigate Racial Disparities at Your School

We published a trove of education data on more than 96,000 public schools across the country. Here’s how journalists can use our database to find local stories.

More Than Me Addresses Inaccurate Tax Returns, Loses 2 Board Members, Has Funds Suspended by Donor

The charity, featured in a ProPublica investigation and documentary, misreported contributions to the IRS.

4 Members of Violent White Supremacist Group Face Riot Charges, Federal Authorities Say

The charges against members of the Rise Above Movement come weeks after four other members or associates of the group were indicted on riot charges in Virginia.

Amid Protest in Liberia, Its Vice President Gets List of Demands About More Than Me

Protesters want the government to revoke the American charity’s accreditation and permission to run schools.

Explore Racial Disparities in Hundreds of Illinois Schools and Districts

Takeaways from our “Miseducation” app and how you can use it, too.

Charlottesville’s Other Jim Crow Legacy: Separate and Unequal Education

The Virginia city has one of the widest achievement gaps in the U.S., and a ProPublica/New York Times analysis shows that white students there are about four times as likely as black students to be considered gifted.

More Than Me CEO Katie Meyler Temporarily Steps Down

Four days after ProPublica published a story about the charity, its board chairman has also resigned, multiple groups are conducting independent investigations and Liberians are outraged.

Unprotected

Katie Meyler’s charity, More Than Me, was created to save vulnerable girls from sexual exploitation. But from the very beginning, girls were being raped by a man Meyler trusted.

Four Men Arrested Over Unrest During 2017 “Unite the Right” Rally

The four are members or associates of the Rise Above Movement, a white supremacist group based in Southern California, prosecutors say.

“A Never-Ending Commitment”: The High Cost of Preserving Vulnerable Beaches

In the wake of hurricanes like Florence, the U.S. government pays to dump truckloads of sand onto eroding beaches, in a cycle that is said to harm ecosystems and disproportionately benefit the rich.

Bipartisan Furor as North Carolina Election Law Shrinks Early Voting Locations by Almost 20 Percent

Nearly half of the state’s counties are shutting down polling places, in part because of a law passed in June.

Black Patients Miss Out On Promising Cancer Drugs

A ProPublica analysis found that black people and Native Americans are under-represented in clinical trials of new drugs, even when the treatment is aimed at a type of cancer that disproportionately affects them.

Note to the Next Mayor: Chicago Is a City of the World, But We Want the Neighborhoods Fixed, Too

In the community where Officer Jason Van Dyke shot Laquan McDonald four years ago, residents worry about policing, crime and inequality.

There Was a Plan to Save This City From Flooding. But When the Rains Came, So Did Hesitance.

The Army Corps of Engineers’ delay in activating a floodway — land designated to take on water — cost millions of dollars in damage to Cairo, Illinois, and surrounding communities in 2011.

How the Army Corps’ Hesitation Nearly Destroyed a City

When the worst flood in nearly a century hit Cairo, Illinois, in 2011, the Army Corps waited before following an emergency plan designed to save a city of 2,800 people. See how that week unfolded and the delays and indecision that cost millions in avoidable damage.

Marines Move to Tackle Racial Extremists in the Corps

An updated order emphasizes that participating in white supremacist groups is prohibited and calls on service members to report those who violate the policy.

What’s the City of Chicago Doing About Its Problem With Duplicate Sticker Tickets?

Seven weeks after the city pledged to address the issue, drivers are still on the hook — and now Chicago’s ticketing practices are becoming an issue in the mayor’s race.

48 Hours in Charlottesville: Fear, Nausea, and a Sad Lack of Surprise

The violence didn’t shock me; the inaction in the face of it did.

New York City Launches Initiative to Eliminate Racial Disparities in Maternal Death

A Central Brooklyn hospital featured in ProPublica and NPR’s “Lost Mothers” series for its high hemorrhage rate will serve as a pilot for quality reforms.

The “Terrible” Consequences of Chicago’s Ticketing Policies

The city tried to raise revenues by hiking the cost of sticker tickets, but instead hurt motorists in low-income, black neighborhoods.

Chicago Hiked the Cost of Vehicle City Sticker Violations to Boost Revenue. But It’s Driven More Low-Income, Black Motorists Into Debt.

Now, a former official regrets the move and wants the city to revisit it. Some policies, she said, are “terrible.”

Facebook Promises to Bar Advertisers From Targeting Ads by Race or Ethnicity. Again.

Settling an investigation by the state of Washington prompted by a ProPublica story, the social networking company said it would no longer allow advertisers to exclude users by any federally protected categories.

In New York, Intolerance Has Become Routine

A Human Rights Commission report says almost 40 percent of Muslim, Jewish and Sikh residents of the city surveyed had experienced some kind of harassment.

How the Fight Against Affirmative Action at Harvard Could Threaten Rich Whites

If preferences for black and Hispanic applicants are abolished, expect a backlash against admissions boosts for children of alumni and donors.

A Day After Report, Violent White Supremacist Loses Job With Defense Contractor

The CEO of Northrop Grumman told employees he was saddened by ProPublica and Frontline’s report concerning Michael Miselis, an aerospace engineer who took part in the violence in Charlottesville last year.

How ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ Worked Together to Find Thousands of Duplicate Tickets in Chicago

We heard from you about how ticket debt, especially from $200 city sticker citations, has affected you. And we would like your help as we continue our reporting.

American Hate Group Looks to Make Allies in Europe

Trips to Ukraine. Mixed martial arts events with a white supremacy flavor. California’s Rise Above Movement goes on the road.

He Is a Member of a Violent White Supremacist Group. So Why Is He Working for a Defense Contractor With a Security Clearance?

Michael Miselis took part in the violent Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. So far, it hasn’t damaged his standing at Northrop Grumman.

I Went in Search of Abandoned African-American Cemeteries

I found a couple, and some fascinating history, too.

U.S. Senate Committee Proposes $50 Million to Prevent Mothers Dying in Childbirth

After years of Congressional inaction, legislators in both parties want to back efforts by states and hospitals to reduce the U.S. maternal mortality rate, the highest in the developed world.

U.S. Marine to Be Imprisoned Over Involvement With Hate Groups

Vasillios Pistolis had bragged online about his affiliations and his role in the violence in Charlottesville last year. He is now likely to be forced from the Marine Corps.?

Behind the Criminal Immigration Law: Eugenics and White Supremacy

The history of the statute that can make it a felony to illegally enter the country involves some dark corners of U.S. history.

How Racial Profiling Goes Unchecked in Immigration Enforcement

A Pennsylvania judge heard uncontested evidence that ICE agents violated constitutional rights during an arrest last year, but that wasn’t enough to stop deportation proceedings.

An Alarming Tip About a Neo-Nazi Marine, Then an Uncertain Response

A former Marine says he alerted the Corps to a white supremacist in its ranks last October. Six months later, he wonders how seriously the Corps is investigating.

At a Killer’s Sentencing, Native Americans Talk of Both Healing and Enduring Suspicions

A white man in Washington state got 7 1/2 years for a killing some said was fueled by hate.

Chicago Begins To Rethink How Bankruptcy Lawyers Get Paid

Judges are demanding that lawyers tell their clients that their other debts might not get paid, but their lawyers will.

Marines Open Investigation into Active-Duty White Supremacist

The inquiry begins after a ProPublica and Frontline investigation and as a congressman calls on Department of Defense to better police its ranks.

He’s a Proud Neo-Nazi, Charlottesville Attacker – and a U.S. Marine

Vasilios Pistolis, a Marine, took part in the violent Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville and later bragged about it online with other members of Atomwaffen, an extremist group preparing for a race war.

Climate Change and Vulnerable Communities — Let’s Talk About This Hot Mess.

In my first episode of this PBS Digital Studios show, I dissect why minorities and disadvantaged people will face bigger consequences in a warming world.

Ranks of Notorious Hate Group Include Active-Duty Military

A Marine took part in the violent assaults in Charlottesville last summer and later bragged about it online with other members of Atomwaffen, an extremist group preparing for a race war. The involvement of current or former service members — often with sophisticated weapons training — in white supremacist groups has long been a concern.

A Killing at Donkey Creek

Jimmy Smith-Kramer, a basketball legend on the Quinault Nation reservation, was 20 when he was mowed down by a white man in a pickup truck. The decision not to charge a hate crime, and recent talk of a plea deal, has re-opened ancient wounds.

Shutdown of Texas Schools?Probe Shows Trump Administration Pullback on Civil Rights

The U.S. Department of Education was investigating why black students in Bryan, Texas, are almost four times as likely as white students to be suspended. Then Betsy DeVos took over.

Jacksonville Sheriff Uses Misleading Data to Defend Pedestrian Ticketing

Sheriff Mike Williams has sought to counter the findings of racial disparities in pedestrian ticketing with his own set of numbers. They don’t add up.

Chicago’s Gang Database Isn’t Just About Gangs

Why are the Black Panthers listed alongside street gangs?

NAACP Legal Defense Fund in Jacksonville Over Pedestrian Ticket Enforcement

Reporting by The Florida Times-Union and ProPublica prompts the Legal Defense Fund to start on-the-ground interviews.

Fair Housing Groups Sue Facebook for Allowing Discrimination in Housing Ads

Borrowing from ProPublica’s playbook, advocates created fake companies and bought discriminatory ads on the social network.

Jacksonville Sheriff Admits Race May Have Played a Role in Ticket Writing

The sheriff says blacks were not targeted for pedestrian tickets but “implicit bias” might have factored into enforcement by officers.

The FBI — ‘Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity’ — Still Working on Diversity

The nation’s top federal law enforcement agency is overwhelmingly white, and its top officials acknowledge that’s “a huge operational risk.”

How Chicago Ticket Debt Sends Black Motorists Into Bankruptcy

A cash-strapped city employs punitive measures to collect from cash-strapped black residents — and lawyers benefit.

The Many Roads to Bankruptcy

Here are some stories of Chicagoans driven into ticket debt.

Congressman’s Bill Would Force Trump Administration to Fulfill Pledge to Study Racial Disparities in Auto Insurance Pricing

Rep. Mark Takano, D-Calif., cited our report that minority neighborhoods pay higher car insurance premiums than white areas with the same risk.

Sheriff’s Officers Working Black Section of Jacksonville to Get Bias Training

The effort comes as Jacksonville has seen controversial police shootings, arrests of activists and calls to suspend pedestrian ticketing in light of racial disparities.

Jacksonville City Council President and Local Public Defender Call for Suspension of Pedestrian Ticket Writing

A legal bulletin by the Jacksonville state attorney supports the finding that sheriff’s officers have been issuing hundreds of tickets in error, a disproportionate number of them to blacks.

How Hospitals Are Failing Black Mothers

A ProPublica analysis shows that women who deliver at hospitals that disproportionately serve black mothers are at a higher risk of harm.

What We Discovered During a Year of Documenting Hate

Hate crimes often fall through the cracks in our justice system, and we've only just scratched the surface of understanding why.

Florida Police Issue Hundreds of Bad Pedestrian Tickets Every Year Because They Don’t Seem to Know the Law

The tickets for failing to cross in a crosswalk don’t just carry fines; they can damage credit rating and lead to the suspensions of driver’s licenses. A Florida Times-Union/ProPublica examination shows lots of them never should have been issued.

Chicago Police Win Big When Appealing Discipline

Analysis shows hundreds of misconduct findings overturned.

Pedestrian Tickets Lead to Hundreds of Suspended Driver’s Licenses

In Jacksonville, not paying your jaywalking ticket can cost you the ability to get to school or work. Again, blacks bear a disproportionate impact.

Black Women Disproportionately Suffer Complications of Pregnancy and Childbirth. Let’s Talk About It.

We started with 10 women who faced six different maternal complications.

Nothing Protects Black Women From Dying in Pregnancy and Childbirth

Not education. Not income. Not even being an expert on racial disparities in health care.

Local Lawmakers and Civil Rights Groups Call for Suspending Pedestrian Tickets in Jacksonville

Concerns about targeted enforcement against African Americans come after a Florida Times-Union/ProPublica investigation.

Why America Fails at Gathering Hate Crime Statistics

The FBI relies on local law enforcement agencies to identify and report crimes motivated by bias, but many agencies fumble this task.

Facebook to Temporarily Block Advertisers From Excluding Audiences by Race

The social network’s actions come after a ProPublica investigation revealed that Facebook failed to keep its promise to reject discriminatory housing ads.

Hate Crime Training for Police Is Often Inadequate, Sometimes Nonexistent

Only a fraction of bias crimes ever get reported. Fewer still get successfully prosecuted. Perhaps the widespread lack of training for frontline officers has something to do with that.

Facebook (Still) Letting Housing Advertisers Exclude Users by Race

After ProPublica revealed last year that Facebook advertisers could target housing ads to whites only, the company announced it had built a system to spot and reject discriminatory ads. We retested and found major omissions.

One Officer, Scores of Tickets and a Familiar Racial Disparity

C.J. Brown wrote four times as many pedestrian tickets as any other officer in Jacksonville over the last five years. Most of them went to blacks. His boss says he’s just “good at his job.”

Walking While Black

Jacksonville’s enforcement of pedestrian violations raises concerns that it’s another example of racial profiling.

The Ticketed Feel Targeted

A truck driver, a mother, a lawyer and a number of young men offer their accounts of walking while black.

How (Not) to Cross the Street in Jacksonville

The city’s population is 29 percent black, but black pedestrians received 55 percent of the pedestrian tickets issued from 2012 to July 2017. Looking at each type of ticket issued reveals even bigger disparities.

Walking While Black

After watching a viral video of a Jacksonville cop stopping a young black man for jaywalking, reporters Ben Conarck and Topher Sanders examine how “walking while black” can come at a high price.

White Supremacists Share Bomb-Making Materials in Online Chats

Chat logs made available to ProPublica show talk of mass killings and the recipes that could be used to carry them out.

Info Wars: Inside the Left’s Online Efforts to Out White Supremacists

An anonymous group of vigilantes works to identify racists, a legally gray tactic known as doxxing that comes with plenty of risk for all.

For Some Youths, ‘Minor’ Offenses Lead to Major Sentences in Adult Prison

Cases threaten to undermine Illinois’ efforts at juvenile justice reform.

Racist, Violent, Unpunished: A White Hate Group’s Campaign of Menace

They train to fight. They post their beatings online. And so far, they have little reason to fear the authorities.

Unmasking California’s New White Supremacists

A group of young white supremacists, known as the Rise Above Movement, coordinated violence at rallies in Charlottesville, VA and across California cities. We identified some of the group members using social media posts and the group’s own propaganda.

‘Partisan’ Gerrymandering Is Still About Race

The Wisconsin case before the Supreme Court claims to be about partisanship. But race is a factor in this case and many others nationwide.

Without Fanfare, Equifax Makes Bankruptcy Change That Affects Hundreds of Thousands

For years, an Equifax policy has treated some Chapter 13 filers differently than the other two major credit rating agencies. After ProPublica asked about it, the company said it would change the policy.

Chicago’s Bankruptcy Boom

ProPublica’s analysis of racial disparities in bankruptcy revealed a skyrocketing number of filings in Chicago’s black neighborhoods. But most of the cases will fall apart before the debts are wiped away.

Data Analysis: Bankruptcy and Race in America

An in-depth discussion of racial patterns in bankruptcy filings and outcomes

In the South, Bankruptcy Is Different, Especially for Black Debtors

Only in the South is Chapter 13 the predominant form of bankruptcy. We mapped Chapter 13’s usage to show that it breaks not only along regional, but also racial lines.

How the Bankruptcy System Is Failing Black Americans

Black people struggling with debts are far less likely than their white peers to gain lasting relief from bankruptcy, according to a ProPublica analysis. Primarily to blame is a style of bankruptcy practiced by lawyers in the South.

White Supremacists Joked About Using Cars to Run Over Opponents Before Charlottesville

Leaked chat room conversations reveal expectations of violence — along with detailed planning and intelligence gathering on left-wing adversaries.

When Hate Meets Hoax

After a string of racist messages rocked a college in Minnesota, a fabricated note introduced a toxic sense of uncertainty that undermined attempts to address a serious social problem.

Spurned by Major Companies, The Daily Stormer Returns to the Web With Help From a Startup

The 20-year-old founder of BitMitigate said he had taken on the neo-Nazi website because he believes in free speech and because, “I thought it would really get my service out there.”

Track News Stories About Hate With the Documenting Hate News Index

We’re launching a new interactive project, the Documenting Hate News Index, that shows just how ubiquitous hate incidents really are.

A New Generation of White Supremacists Emerges in Charlottesville

A group that included many people who were college-educated or ex-military displayed effective planning. “White people are pretty good at getting organized,” said one.

Police Stood By As Mayhem Mounted in Charlottesville

State police and National Guardsmen watched passively for hours as self-proclaimed Nazis engaged in street battles with counter-protesters. ProPublica reporter A.C. Thompson was on the scene and reports that the authorities turned the streets of the city over to groups of militiamen armed with assault rifles.

Who’s Taking College Spots From Top Asian Americans? Privileged Whites.

The Trump administration is preparing to investigate whether Asian Americans are treated unfairly as a result of admissions policies intended to boost the chances of other racial minorities.

Sikhs in America: A History of Hate

Demonized as immigrants. Mistaken for Muslims. For more than a century, Sikhs in the U.S. have faced suspicion and violence.

Amid the Blaring Headlines, Routine Reports of Hate-Fueled Violence

Documenting Hate’s catalogue of incidents captures the seeming ordinariness of many of them.

Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men From Hate Speech But Not Black Children

A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression.

Democratic Senators Condemn Betsy DeVos’ Record on Civil Rights

More than 30 “disappointed and alarmed” senators penned a letter chastising civil rights enforcement at the Department of Education.

Trump Administration Quietly Rolls Back Civil Rights Efforts Across Federal Government

Previously unannounced directives will limit the Department of Justice’s use of a storied civil rights enforcement tool, and loosen the Department of Education’s requirements on investigations.

California to Investigate Racial Discrimination in Auto Insurance Premiums

The state’s insurance department is following up on our findings that eight auto insurers charge more in minority neighborhoods than in other neighborhoods with similar risk.

Lawmakers Seek Stronger Monitoring of Racial Disparities in Car Insurance Premiums

In response to our report that minority neighborhoods pay higher premiums than white areas with the same risk, six members of Congress and two Illinois state senators are pushing for closer scrutiny of insurance practices.

DeVos Pick to Head Civil Rights Office Once Said She Faced Discrimination for Being White

Candice Jackson’s intellectual journey raises questions about how actively she will investigate allegations of unfair treatment of minorities and women.

Hate Crime Law Results in Few Convictions and Lots of Disappointment

In Texas, the tiny number of successful prosecutions leave both victims and lawmakers questioning state's commitment to punishing hate.

Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas With the Same Risk

Our analysis of premiums and payouts in California, Illinois, Texas and Missouri shows that some major insurers charge minority neighborhoods as much as 30 percent more than other areas with similar accident costs.

A 2-for-1 for Racists: Post Hateful Fliers, and Revel in the News Coverage

White supremacists have targeted college campuses, causing upset and gaining attention.

Justice Department Changes Position on Texas’ Discriminatory Voter ID Law

The DOJ, now overseen by Jeff Sessions, is walking back years of effort aimed at limiting the harmful effect of state voter ID measure on minorities.

When the Government Really Did Fear a Bowling Green Massacre — From a White Supremacist

Assault rifles, body armor, a possible kill list, but not much attention when feds arrested a white man they said was bent on “race war.”

Teens Report Onslaught of Bullying During Divisive Election

In a survey of 50,000 teens, some 70 percent reported abusive behavior across months of a notably angry presidential campaign.

An Ocean Apart, But United in Concerns About Hate Crimes

The violence in Great Britain after the Brexit vote might hold lessons for America.

Alleged Chicago Assault Reignites Issue of Hate Crimes Against Whites

As Chicago authorities waited before filing hate-crime charges against four young adult blacks for an alleged attack on a white disabled man, the Internet raged.

Rare Track Record: NYPD’s History Chronicling Hate Crimes

For decades, a hate crimes task force has been on the case in New York. But even that sustained effort may not be catching all crimes.

‘What’s Going On, Daddy’: A Reporter on the Hate Beat Finds 2 Very Local Stories

A brutal beating; a terrible murder. Seeking motives in a divided America.

‘As a White Nationalist, What Do You Do?’

A conversation with a scholar of America’s extreme right

In An Ugly Election Result, Hate Surges Online

Has Trump emboldened extremists? Some disquieting early returns.

Hate Crimes Are Up — But the Government Isn’t Keeping Good Track of Them

There is considerable anxiety about the potential for violence after a bitter national election. The data kept on hate crimes won’t reassure anyone.

Facebook Says it Will Stop Allowing Some Advertisers to Exclude Users by Race

Facebook says it will build a system to prevent advertisers from buying credit, housing or employment ads that exclude viewers by race.

HUD Has ‘Serious Concerns’ About Facebook’s Ethnic Targeting

Federal officials are taking a close look at a sales practice that allows advertisers on the social network to include or exclude people who have an “affinity” with specific ethnic groups.

Facebook Lets Advertisers Exclude Users by Race

Facebook’s system allows advertisers to exclude black, Hispanic, and other “ethnic affinities” from seeing ads.

Breaking the Black Box: How Machines Learn to Be Racist

Artificial Intelligence is only as good as the patterns we teach it. To illustrate the sensitivity of AI systems, we built an AI engine that deduced synonyms from news articles published by different types of news organizations.

‘Only White People,’ Said the Little Girl

On a playground, the messy birth of a 5-year-old's “otherness.”

Discrimination by Design

The many ways design decisions treat people unequally.

Busted

Tens of thousands of people every year are sent to jail based on the results of a $2 roadside drug test. Widespread evidence shows that these tests routinely produce false positives. Why are police departments and prosecutors still using them?

What Algorithmic Injustice Looks Like in Real Life

A computer program rated defendants’ risk of committing a future crime. These are the results.

Machine Bias

There’s software used across the country to predict future criminals. And it’s biased against blacks.

NYPD Chief: Police ‘Will Continue to Aggressively Enforce Nuisance Abatement’

In response to an investigation by the Daily News and ProPublica, New York City’s police commissioner Bill Bratton insists nuisance cases remain a critical tool for keeping neighborhoods safe.

The Best MuckReads on America’s Troubled History With Race

To mark Black History Month, we’ve rounded up some of the best reporting on America’s troubled history with race and inequality.

NYPD to Change How Police Use Nuisance Abatement Law

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said New York City is retreating from the practice of locking out tenants before they even see a judge.

Officials Outraged After ‘Shocking’ Report on NYPD Kicking People Out of Homes

New York City officials said reforms were needed after our investigation showed that the police have been locking out residents who haven’t been charged with a crime.

The NYPD Is Kicking People Out of Their Homes, Even if They Haven’t Committed a Crime

And it’s happening almost exclusively in minority neighborhoods.

Why Small Debts Matter So Much To Black Lives

Due to the racial wealth gap, black families have far less in savings than whites. The consequences can be far-reaching and often severe.

Why Counting Mass Shootings is a Bad Way to Understand Gun Violence in America

It glosses over the broader reality of who is most at risk of being murdered with guns.

To Address Race Gap, Missouri AG Pushes Debt Collection Fixes

Citing ProPublica’s reporting, Missouri’s attorney general proposed reforms to the state court rules to address the prevalence of debt collection suits in black neighborhoods.

How the Gun Control Debate Ignores Black Lives

By failing to talk about the majority of gun murder victims — black men — politicians and advocates are missing the chance to save lives.

The Color of Debt

The black neighborhoods where collection suits hit hardest

The Color of Debt: How Collection Suits Squeeze Black Neighborhoods

In a first-of-its-kind analysis, ProPublica reveals that the suits are far more common in black communities than white ones.

How We Analyzed Racial Disparity in Debt Collection Lawsuits

An explanation of how we analyzed whether debt collection lawsuits disproportionately impact black communities.

Georgia is Segregating Troublesome Kids in Schools Used During Jim Crow

A Department of Justice investigation found that Georgia is giving thousands of kids with behavioral issues a subpar education and putting them in the same run-down buildings that served black children decades ago.

May It Displease the Court: Race and Justice Sotomayor

A book on Justice Sotomayor reveals the bruising backstory to the Texas affirmative action case set to be heard again this fall.

6 Tips for Protecting Your Communications From Prying Eyes

In an age of ubiquitous surveillance, there are still some things you can do to keep your communications private -- and not all of it is high-tech.

Racist Posts on NY Cop Blog Raise Ire at Time of Tension

A blog hosting posts from former and current New York City officers reinforces the worst kinds of stereotypes.

Yes, Black America Fears the Police. Here’s Why.

Shots were fired in Long Island, but there was no rush to call 911. It made perfect sense to ProPublica’s Nikole Hannah-Jones.

Housing Enforcement Group Sues M&T Bank for Discrimination

The unusual lawsuit draws on secret videotapes and recordings to argue that the bank's loan officers discriminated against blacks, Latinos and Asians who applied for mortgages.

Supreme Court’s Latest Race Case: Housing Discrimination

Many fear Texas case could gut the landmark Fair Housing Act.

A National Survey of School Desegregation Orders

Use ProPublica’s reporting to see if your school district is under a court order to end segregation.

How Do You Experience Segregation? Tell Us What #SegregationIs Where You Live

We're working with The New York Times to expose the injustice of segregation and explore what segregation looks and feels like in America today. What does it look like where you live? Share your experience with #SegregationIs.

School Segregation, the Continuing Tragedy of Ferguson

Michael Brown beat the odds by graduating from high school before his death — odds that remain stacked against black students in St. Louis and the rest of the country.

Deadly Force, in Black and White

A ProPublica analysis of killings by police shows outsize risk for young black males.

The Hidden Cost of Gun Violence: Meet a Mother and Her 7-Year-Old With PTSD

Thousands of Americans in high-violence neighborhoods have developed post-traumatic stress. 24-year-old Aireana and her children are among the few who've been able to get treatment.

Interview With Civil Rights Legend John Lewis: Audio

Listen to Nikole Hannah-Jones interview barrier-breaking Freedom Rider and longtime congressman John Lewis.

Long a Force for Progress, a Freedom Summer Legend Looks Back

Georgia Congressman John Lewis talks about what changed — and didn’t — because of the movement he helped to lead 50 years ago.

What to Look For In Dueling Autopsies of Michael Brown

Post Mortem by Michael Baden is only the beginning as teams of specialists study the body of 18-year-old African American killed by police.

Six Days in Ferguson: Voices from the Protests

A day-by-day chronology of what happened in Ferguson, drawn from the best reporting by journalists and witnesses on the ground.

When Freedom Summer Landed in White America’s Living Rooms

An iconic civil rights print hung in one rural Maine home and helped shape a family’s commitment to justice.

In Desegregation Case, Judge Blasts School Officials and Justice Department

A federal judge in Alabama says local school board has failed to meet legal mandate to integrate.

Ghosts of Greenwood

A reporter goes to Mississippi and encounters the echoes of family and the struggle for civil rights.

Student Perspectives on Race and Education in Tuscaloosa

Teens at two high schools helped ProPublica tell the story of resegregation by documenting their experiences in photos. Their work has launched a conversation about race and education in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and beyond.

School Segregation After Brown

Hundreds of school districts were placed under court order to desegregate following the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling. Many communities do not know the status of these orders. Use this tool to find out whether your district is or ever was under a desegregation order, and also to look at the levels of integration and segregation in your schools.

Desegregation Court Records

Search here for desegregation documents we collected during our reporting.

Segregation Now

In Tuscaloosa today, nearly one in three black students attends a school that looks as if Brown v. Board of Education never happened.

A Note to Our Readers on 'Segregation Now'

'Segregation Now' focuses on the Tuscaloosa, Ala., city school district, and its fleeting experience with the challenges and virtues of integration. Here's why we decided to offer it to our readers in discrete chapters over three days.

Video: Saving Central

Meet Principal Clarence Sutton Jr. as he fights to save his students from the effects of resegregation.

Share Your Six Words on Race and Education in America

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared an end to “separate but equal” education, many Southern school districts have moved back in time, isolating poor black and Latino students in segregated schools. ProPublica investigates Tuscaloosa’s city schools, which are among the most rapidly resegregating in the country.

HUD Finally Stirs on Housing Discrimination

After decades of inaction, the Department of Housing and Urban Development has begun to move against two localities for allegedly violating the Fair Housing Act.

The Impact and Echoes of the Wal-Mart Discrimination Case

Two years after the Supreme Court decision tossing a sex discrimination case against the giant retailer, lawyers for women and minorities are navigating an altered legal landscape.

March on Washington Anniversary: Great Reads on Racial Justice

It's been 50 years since the historic March on Washington. Here's some of the best reporting on the ongoing fight for civil rights.

Law to Clean Up 'Nuisances' Costs Innocent People Their Homes

Law enforcement authorities are moving to seize homes, cash and other property of people tangentially related to crimes under “civil forfeiture” laws that require minimal proof.

Timeline: America’s Long Civil Rights March

ProPublica has created a timeline to appreciate the key moments and often differing aims of the government's judicial and legislative branches in the ongoing clash over civil rights.

America's Long Civil Rights March, Complete With Stops and Starts

Last Month's Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act was just the latest move in a 150-year dance between the high court and Congress over the protections owed this country's African Americans. ProPublica has created a timeline to appreciate the key moments and often differing aims of the government's judicial and legislative branches.

Housing Crisis: Widespread Discrimination; Little Taste for Enforcement

A nationwide survey by HUD reveals, again, that minorities face racism in the housing market. But HUD, again, chooses not to punish the offenders.

Are California Prisons Punishing Inmates Based on Race?

State officials say they need to protect inmates from race-based gang violence. But a lawsuit says frequent lockdowns smack of segregation.

Another Race Case for a Hostile Supreme Court

The Supreme Court, poised to rule on a major affirmative action case, accepts another one. What this might say about dismantling race-conscious programs.

Five Ways Courts Say Texas Discriminated Against Black and Latino Voters

Separate federal panels struck down two Texas voting provisions. We look at examples of discrimination they found.

Land Grab Cheats North Dakota Tribes Out of $1 Billion, Suits Allege

Native Americans on an oil-rich reservation have been cheated out of more than $1 billion by schemes to buy drilling rights for lowball prices — and the federal government failed in its legal obligation to ensure a fair deal, lawsuits claim.

Audit: Blacks, Latinos Still Likely to Face Housing Bias in Whitest Parts of Westchester

Three years after Westchester County entered into a landmark desegregation settlement with the federal government, tests show that minority home seekers still face discrimination in many areas.

Housing Segregation: The Great Migration and Beyond

Explore the great migration of African Americans from 1940 to 2000 and segregation in Northern cities.

No Sting: Feds Won't Go Undercover to Prove Housing Discrimination

African Americans and Latinos are turned away from homes and apartments millions of times annually because of their race, yet the federal government seldom uses undercover investigations, which are the most effective means of catching biased landlords and real estate agents.

Mapping Segregation in Westchester

ProPublica decided to evaluate race and income data for Westchester County to determine whether income alone accounts for the high degree of racial segregation experienced by African Americans there.

Soft on Segregation: How the Feds Failed to Integrate Westchester County

Despite a court order, HUD hasn't made wealthy Westchester County — home to President Clinton and Gov. Cuomo — remove barriers to African Americans and Latinos moving in.

Reading Guide: Segregation in America

What continues to drive housing segregation? What are the consequences? We rounded up some of the best reporting on the subject.

PubNotes: Key Takeaways From ProPublica’s Fair Housing Investigation

An overview of the U.S. government's many failed attempts to promote integrated housing since the Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968.

Big Banks Slack on Maintaining Foreclosed Homes in Minority Areas, Complaint Charges

Housing advocates allege that Wells Fargo and U.S. Bank violated the Fair Housing Act by taking better care of foreclosed homes in white neighborhoods than in black and Latino neighborhoods.

School of Hard Knocks: Fed Education Data Shows Racial Disparities, Unequal Opportunity

Department of Education releases wide range of data on schools. ProPublica will clean, cross-check, and incorporate into our interactive schools app.

NYC’s Anti-Profiling Law: ‘Not Worth Paper It’s Written On’

A law signed by Mayor Bloomberg bars profiling by police based on religion. So, why hasn’t there been an investigation of the NYPD’s surveillance of Muslims?

Racial Disparity in Presidential Pardons: What Can Be Done?

ProPublica found that whites are almost four times as likely as minorities to be pardoned. To break the pattern of bias, experts say, would require reconsidering the subjective factors used to judge applicants.

Presidential Pardons Heavily Favor Whites

To avoid repeating a scandal like his predecessor’s, George W. Bush gave career lawyers in the Justice Department far-reaching authority to choose who got presidential pardons. The result: Whites are nearly four times as likely as minorities to win a pardon, even when the type of crime and severity of sentence are taken into account.

Villages Testify to Disparity in Benefits Alaska Native Corporations Provide

Congress created the system of Alaska Native Corporations with the promise of bringing prosperity to a scattered indigenous population stuck in poverty. The corporations have created pockets of success but not a wide-scale solution for joblessness and substance abuse.

Alaska Native Firms Shift Stimulus Work to Outsiders

A ProPublica analysis shows that Alaska Native Corporations rely heavily on subcontracts with non-native companies to perform stimulus projects they’ve won through special contracting privileges.

What Are Alaska Native Corporations?

Questions and answers about Alaska Native Corporations

Rampant Fraud, Self-Dealing Alleged in Alaska Native Corporation

Cape Fox Corporation was prey to some of the worst abuses in a system that gives Alaska Native Corporations access to no-bid government contracts of unlimited size. As federal contracting grew, benefits went to non-native consultants instead of providing jobs, dividends to natives.

Revenues for ANCs Skyrocket, but Not Payouts to Natives

Revenues of Alaska Native Corporations have skyrocketed thanks to special privileges that allow them to obtain no-bid contracts of unlimited size. But profits and dividends haven’t kept pace, according to an analysis of ANC annual reports online at ProPublica.

Man Indicted for Alleged Racial Attack in Post-Katrina New Orleans

A former New Orleans resident was charged with federal hate crimes for his alleged role in a racially motivated shooting of three black men in the days after Hurricane Katrina.

Air Marshals Dogged by Discrimination Complaints in Field Offices

As the administration looks to tighten air security, charges of discrimination and retaliation may distract federal air marshals from their work. Air marshals have long whispered about their complaints, but two recent cases are bringing public attention to the issue.

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